EV Charging Station security demonstrator

EV Charging Station security demonstrator

TeskaLabs is proud to announce the availability of EV Charging Station security demonstrator. This is a result of our research project. The Meili project was part of the UK Government and its partners Zenzic and InnovateUK 1.2 million British pounds programme to develop a cohesive understanding of the challenges and potential solutions to addressing digital resilience and cyber security within Connected and Automated Mobility.

With the number of electric vehicles and charging stations growing rapidly, possible attacks on charging infrastructure have become a growing threat to energy suppliers and traffic infrastructure.

Charging infrastructure is particularly vulnerable becasue there many entry areas for potential attacks. In general, charging points are unmanned and often located in remote areas, leaving their physical protections compromised. Moreover, connection to back-end servers that store sensitive customer data introduces even more severe threats and challenges into cybersecurity protection.

Specifically, the EV Charging Station security demonstrator extends C-ITS, which is a wireless (ETSI G5-ITS or LTE/5G) communication between vehicles and road-side infrastructure, into the intra-vehicle wired communication; the well-known CAN bus. The Demonstrator illustrates the communication between an electric vehicle and the charger, that happens over the CAN bus.

In response to recent Covid-19 restrictions, TeskaLabs extended the Demonstrator with user interface accessible over Internet (Web UI) to enable remote access to the demonstrator installation.

TeskaLabs has demonstrated that C-ITS security standards can be applied on a much broader spectrum of vehicle communication technologies and use cases, e.g. securing communication between the electric vehicle and the charger.

For more information on the EV Charging Station security demonstrator, please contact us at info@teskalabs.com

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